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What you should know about date rape drugs

By January 7, 2015 Emergency No Comments
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Going out for cocktails and having a good time with friends is meant to be fun, but it doesn’t always end up that way if your drink gets spiked with drugs. Physical assault and rape date are usually motives for giving others date drugs.

What are date drugs?

Date rape drugs, also called “club drugs” are drugs used to assist in a sexual assault, including rape. In some cases they are used to subdue victims with the intention of robbing them. The most common drugs are flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), also called roofies; gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), also called liquid ecstasy; and ketamine, also called Special K.

What are the effects?

Once you drink them, these drugs can affect you very quickly. Victims become weak, confused, often pass out and suffer from amnesia and can’t recall events clearly. If you have an underlying medical condition, these drugs can cause seizures and even death.

How can I protect myself?

Date rape drugs are often colorless, odourless and tasteless. They may come in the form of pills, liquids or powders, so it can be difficult to spot them.

  • Don’t accept drinks or ice cubes from others.
  • Don’t share drinks.
  • Don’t drink from punch bowls or other open serving dishes.
  • Keep your drink with you at all times, even when you go to the bathroom.
  • Open cans and bottles yourself
  • If someone offers to get you a drink from a bar or at a party, go with the person to order your drink. Watch the drink being poured and carry it yourself.
  • Don’t drink anything that tastes or smells strange. Sometimes, GHB tastes salty.
  • Have a non-drinking friend with you to make sure nothing happens.
  • If you leave your drink unattended where someone may have spiked it, don’t drink it.

I think I’ve been drugged, what should I do?

The drugs often have no colour, smell, or taste, so you can’t tell if someone has slipped some in your drink. If you feel drowsy, dizzy or nauseous and haven’t drunk any alcohol, or if you feel like the effects of drinking alcohol are stronger than usual, let those you are with know that you suspect you have been drugged.  Get help by heading to an emergency room immediately.

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